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Category Archives: x0 elsewhere

Like Me?

We refer to it euphemistically as “social networking”, but let’s be more blunt. Facebook has changed the world. Granted it has moved from a universe inhabited by youth to the home of everyone’s great aunt, a storage facility for family photos and a world where pets have their own pages. That doesn’t change the fact that liking and friending are now key concepts for getting along in contemporary society.

It’s also part of modern marketing, and apparently I am well behind the times for not having realized this. Silly me, I was all caught up in the family photo thing.Well I’m proud to say I have now entered the year 2005 and made a Facebook page for my collection of books.You can find it here or by searching for Number 46. Ascending on Facebook.

FB
As I understand it, the object of the game here is to get more and more people to like my page, and as they do they comment on or share things I post and it gets increasingly easier to get even more people (you know, actual strangers) to like me too. It sounds a little like playing Risk or Monopoly. If I get enough momentum going, I take over the world. And maybe after awhile one of these likers even buys a book.
Why wouldn’t you like somebody’s Facebook page? The biggest reason is that you rightly fear getting a deluge of stupid posts from them that clutter up your news feed. It has happened too often to me, and after a few days of junk I most emphatically do NOT like the product, person or page. So obviously this marketing approach requires ongoing thought and courtesy on the part of the poster, or a “now I actually hate you” button provided for the general masses.
In spite of these difficulties, I’d like you to like me. Fear not for your news feed. I am a delicate poster, aware of your sensibilities. I promise to be barely a flutter in your daily Facebook life, and if possible an enjoyable one at that.
So please. Like me. I’ll like you back. 🙂
 
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Posted by on October 15, 2013 in x0 elsewhere

 

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x0 on 1670 people’s to-read list!

Like most independent writers who have decided to not go the traditional publishing route, I am always looking for effective ways to promote my three novels. I don’t have training in advertising, and in truth I would much rather write than sell. However, if I am going to spend some time trying to get folks to read my books, I would like that time to be as productive as possible.

goodreadsSo far, my best results seem to have come from advertising and doing give-aways on Goodreads.com. After about six months of steady effort, I am happy to see that I now have 77 ratings and 43 reviews (mostly good), and over 2700 different people have selected one or more of my books to go on their shelf of books to be read.

I have been promoting x0 for the longest, and so not surprisingly it has the most reviews and most would-be readers. It’s true that some ratings appear to be random from people who have just joined the site and haven’t read my books and I have no idea why someone would do that. (These people seem to grab about 50 random books all on the same day and often give them all the same rating, be it three stars or five.)

Others, however, have taken the trouble to provide thoughtful reviews with both compliments and criticisms and their efforts are greatly appreciated by this author and hopefully by the possible readers who they help inform.

Check here for news on z2 out in paperback and here for news on y1 making it to the semi-finals of a contest.

 

 
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Posted by on July 2, 2013 in x0 elsewhere

 

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small world shrinking

I’ve been interviewed and x0 has been reviewed by two fascinating young women from India, who ask great questions and make excellent points in their review.  Please check out their blog “The Pensive Phoenix” here.

 
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Posted by on May 12, 2013 in x0 elsewhere

 

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And the object of the game is ….

india school busI’m giving some thought today to negative stereotypes associated with India, particularly those held by my fellow citizens of the USA. There are plenty, let’s face it. We paint a comic insult cartoon of every other nation on earth, although some caricatures, like the stuffy Brit, do imply a bit of fondness. I wonder if every other culture does the same. I think I am going to go with yes on this one, and guess that all caricatures of us are not that fond either.

Several years ago a good friend of mine was told his job was being outsourced to India.  The friend is an electrical engineer who spent years writing in machine code to tell your car’s more intelligent parts exactly how to behave. It was a high level skill and he was very good at it, but he was told that his company had a found a kid in India who would do the job at a fraction of the cost and, as his last assignment, my friend was to train his replacement. Yeah right. Guess I’m just not going to remember a whole lot to teach him, my friend laughed. I sympathized.

And then, he started to talk to the young man, who turned out to be smart, eager and happy beyond belief to have gotten this job.  It was going to make him one of the richest people in his village.  One of the most successful members of his family ever. He and everyone he knew were rejoicing at this incredible good fortune. So of course my friend started to remember more and more to teach him, and before he was done he had passed along every trick and shortcut he knew. The young man was so grateful and once he took over my friends job I’m told that he was very good at it.

So was my friend successful, or not? That depends on how you define success. Remember board games?  The directions always started out with “The object of the game is……” Surely I’m not the only person who has wished that real life came with such clear information. If the object of your game is to make as much money as you can, as easily as you can, then my friend failed.  And, let me add that if such is your object, you should consider something other than writing self-published novels. They are exhausting to write, they take forever, and you can probably count on a few dollars a month in return.

india mapBut what if success is having a more interesting life? Learning things you never knew you never knew? I firmly believe that the internet has brought the world together in ways we are just beginning to understand, and it has done this for anyone who gets online. But writing and self-publishing three novels has taken this to a whole new level for me. I now share ideas and information with readers and fellow writers in a global community that would have astounded my seventh grade self, a girl who could barely contain her excitement at being allowed to study world geography. Today, copies of my three books exist in over twenty countries. I’m pleased beyond belief.

And later this week, I’m going to be interviewed on a blog written by two young women in India. I’ve done a fair amount of such interviews already, but this one is different because I didn’t go to them. They found my book, read my book, liked my book, and sought me out. All the way from India. Is that cool or what?

The young woman I’ve been corresponding with works as an instrumentation engineer and she also has aspirations to write. She wondered how I manage to raise a family, have a technical career and find time to be an author. I told her that I didn’t manage all at once, rather the writing started once the kids were older and job demands lessened. I offered advice on any of the above if I could ever be of help. I suspect that she has plenty she could teach me as well.

Did I mention that my my friend the electrical engineer learned quite a bit from the young Indian man he instructed? Well he did, of course, for in the best of circumstances knowledge flows two ways. Not every outsourcing story ends so well, but in my friend’s case his employer was so impressed with the job that he did training this kid, and with the new skills he picked up while doing so, that they decided to keep him on also. He trained a few others for them and then he went back to happily writing machine code, using all he had learned to his advantage. Your car may run better because of his story.

So what’s the object of the game? Some days I think I know, other days I’m not so sure. But I am am pretty certain that my friend’s story is a success story, in more ways than one. And I do know that I gained far more than I hoped for when I picked up my laptop and started to write my first novel. If gaining more than you hope for isn’t success, what is?

 
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Posted by on May 11, 2013 in empathy, x0 elsewhere

 

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Wow — I made a top 10 of 2012!

Wahoo  — here’s one thing I can check off of my personal bucket list!new year

Shedrick Pittman-Hassett  is a writer, blogger, librarian and book reviewer par excellence and was kind enough to review x0 way back in May of 2012 on his blog Serial Distractions.  He just came out with his personal “Top Distractions of 2012” and — yes — x0 by Sherrie Cronin came in at 10 of 10.  (Hey, that is still making the list :). )

For nine other great reviews and nine additional interesting reading recommendations, please check out his blog here. And have yourself a wonderful New Year’s Day.

 
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Posted by on January 1, 2013 in x0 elsewhere

 

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I’ve been interviewed

Please check out the blog “The Cult of Me” for a short interview of mine.  Fellow indie author Michael Brookes also shares interesting observations about the process of writing on his blog, and features regular interviews with those of us trying to get started as new authors. It’s a fun blog to follow.

I also have Michael to thank for pointing out to me how easy it would be to make paperback copies of x0 and y1 available. I ordered a copy of his book “The Cult of Me” and was impressed with both the quality of the physical book and with his story so far.

It is likely that both x0 and y1 will be available in paperback soon!

 
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Posted by on October 2, 2012 in x0 elsewhere

 

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Making a little noise

It’s been nice to make a little positive noise lately, including a couple of good new reviews on amazon.com, a nice review on The Virtual Muser eBook Review, and a short interview on Hock G. Tjoa‘s blog. Please check them out.  Both Virtual Muser and Hock G. Tjoa are very interesting places to visit as they both make a point of seeking out new authors doing something a little different. Both are good places to discover reading material you might not easily find elsewhere.

Also thanks to everyone who clicked on x0 for me at Best Indie Books.  Thanks to you I’m ranked 10th out of, well, lots of books. If you feel like doing a quick good deed, click on the link above, scroll down to x0 and just click one last time for me. Thanks!

 
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Posted by on August 21, 2012 in x0 elsewhere

 

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